Seminars at the Faculty of Informatics

Informatics Seminar on Monday,March 17 at 9.30 - Dr. Martin Theobald

The Faculty of Informatics is pleased to announce a seminar given by Dr. Martin Theobald

 

TITLE: Trio: A System for Data, Uncertainty, and Lineage

SPEAKER: Dr. Martin Theobald, Stanford Infolab

DATE: Monday, March 17, 2008

PLACE: USI Università della Svizzera italiana, room A31, Red building (Via G. Buffi 13)

TIME: 09:30 - 10:30

 

ABSTRACT:

Trio is a new kind of database system that supports DBMS-style data management, uncertainty, and lineage in a fully integrated manner. The talk presents the ULDB (for Uncertainty-Lineage-Databases) data model, an extension of relational databases with simple yet expressive constructs for representing and manipulating both lineage and uncertainty. Uncertain data and data lineage are two important areas of data management that have been considered extensively in isolation, however many applications require the features in tandem. Fundamentally, lineage enables simple and consistent representation of uncertain data, it correlates uncertainty in query results with uncertainty in the input data, and query processing with lineage and uncertainty together presents computational benefits over treating them separately. We show that the ULDB representation is complete, and that it permits straightforward implementation of many relational operations. Finally, we'll have a look at the current state of our first Trio prototype system, dubbed Trio-One, currently under development at Stanford.

Trio-One, our implementation of the ULDB model, is built on top of a conventional DBMS using data and query translation techniques together with a small number of stored procedures.

 

BIOGRAPHY:

I'm currently pursuing a Post-Doc at the Stanford Infolab after having received my PhD in May 2006 from the Max Planck Institute for Informatics in Saarbrücken, Germany. I studied Computer Science at the Saarland University between 1998 and 2002, where I graduated with a Diploma in Informatics in March 2002.